22 Popular Types Of Mexican Bread You Should Try

The bread from Mexico is very different from that of other countries. Bread is typical in all cultures; the differences are made basically with ingredients and the approach to making it and eating it. In Mexico, some bread is consumed in its original form while others are mixed to prepare drinks, appetizers, and desserts. Others even serve as an accompaniment to main dishes. Did you know how many types of Mexican bread? Read on to get more helpful information.

22 Popular Types of Mexican Bread

Pan de Muerto

Pan de Muerto

This sweet bread is made from a wheat flour dough that has been dyed and decorated with sugar. The name translates to “bread of the dead.” The bread is associated with the Day of the Dead celebration and is often served on that holiday. The name comes from its appearance, which resembles a skull.

Bolillo

Bolillo

A bolillo is a small roll that is eaten in Mexico with meals or as a snack. It’s similar to a baguette, but it’s usually softer, fluffier, and sweeter than a baguette. Bolillos are often eaten plain, but they can be topped with butter or mayonnaise. They’re also sometimes stuffed with ingredients like ham or cheese before they’re baked.

Rosca de Reyes

Rosca de Reyes

This is a sweet yeast bread that is shaped into a ring and topped with a glazed or sugared egg. The Rosca de Reyes is commonly found around Three Kings Day in Mexico. It’s also consumed during Christmas time, especially when people eat it with hot chocolate.

Tortilla

Tortilla

A tortilla is a flat round cake made out of cornmeal and cooked on a hot griddle. Tortillas can be eaten plain or filled with meat, cheese, beans, or vegetables. They can be eaten as an entrée or snack, but they’re also used to wrap up other foods like burritos and tacos.

Totopo

Totopo

Totopo is a traditional Mexican dish that consists of thick corn tortillas topped with beans, cheese, vegetables, and salsa. The name comes from “totopo”, meaning “topped” in Spanish. The tortillas can be made at home or bought at grocery stores; they’re also known as “tortillas de maiz,” or corn tortillas. The dish can be eaten alone or used as an ingredient for other dishes like burritos or enchiladas.

Monkey Bread

Monkey Bread

Monkey bread is a sweet pastry that originated in the United States. The name comes from its appearance: it looks like a bunch of monkeys climbing out of a tree. The original recipe uses canned biscuits and cinnamon, with raisins added for texture and flavor. There are variations in this recipe that use other ingredients, such as peaches, apples, or both!

Elotes

Elotes

Elotes are a Mexican street food that’s made with grilled corn on the cob, slathered in mayonnaise, cheese, and chili powder. Elotes (pronounced “el-oh-tehs”) is a popular snack that’s often served at street fairs, festivals, and other events. It’s an easy dish to make at home for any party or get-together.

Buñuelos (Fried Dough)

Buñuelos

Buñuelos are deep-fried tortilla dough balls commonly eaten as a dessert in Mexico. They’re often topped with powdered sugar, or honey and cinnamon.

Concha

Concha

A concha is a flatbread made from wheat flour and water that’s baked until it becomes hard and crunchy. It’s commonly served as an appetizer or snack, but conchas can also be used to make sandwiches or tacos. Conchas are typically topped with salsas like salsa verde or red salsa Roja, which add moisture to the bread so it doesn’t become dry while baking in the oven.

Telera Bread

Telera, or telera bread, is a type of large loaf that comes from Yucatan and Veracruz. It’s made with flour, water, yeast, and salt and formed into a large round loaf that is then baked in the oven until it’s golden brown. The name comes from the Spanish word for “table” because it’s served at tables along with other foods.

Capirotada

Capirotada

Capirotada is a type of Mexican sweet bread that is made with boiled sweet potatoes, piloncillo, and cinnamon. It’s usually served during Christmas time.

Bunuelos

Bunuelos are fried balls of dough that are made with wheat flour, sugar, and butter. They’re typically served with hot chocolate or coffee for breakfast or dessert.

Cemita Buns

Cemita Buns

Cemita buns are a type of Mexican sandwich that originated in Puebla, Mexico. It consists of two small buns filled with meat, refried beans, and avocado slices. The top bun is usually covered with sesame seeds or other spices such as oregano or cumin powder.

Garlic Cheese Bread

This is a flour tortilla stuffed with cheese and other ingredients, such as chicken or vegetables. The tortilla is cooked on a griddle until both sides are browned and the cheese has melted. It is often served hot with salsa and guacamole for dipping.

Acambarita

This type of Mexican bread is made from cornmeal and water, which are mixed together, then baked in the oven until crisp. Acambaritas are similar to tortillas but have a thicker texture and can be served with a variety of toppings, including meat or beans.

Banderilla

A banderilla is a thin dough baked into small balls and filled with various fillings like cheese, ground beef, or chicken. It’s typically served alongside soups or stews as an appetizer.

Barquillo

This type of Mexican bread comes in a small rectangular shape and is similar to an English muffin in appearance but much denser. It has a crusty exterior and a soft interior that makes it perfect for dipping into soups or frying with eggs.

Mexican Cornbread

This is a very popular type of Mexican bread because it contains cornmeal as well as wheat flour making it sweeter than other types of Mexican bread like barquillos. It has a sweet flavor that goes well with savory dishes such as chili con carne or roasted vegetables.

Oreja

Oreja bread

Orejas are the “ears” of the pan de yema (egg bread). They’re made by cutting off the top of a loaf of egg bread and stuffing them with cheese or other fillings. If you make them yourself, you can use any leftover egg bread scraps as well!

Ojos De Buey

Ojo de buey is small balls of fried dough that serve as an appetizer or dessert. The name translates to “bull’s eye,” which refers to the round shape and golden brown color of these Mexican treats — not the fact that they’re made from bulls’ eyes!

Pan De Yema

Pan De Yema

Pan de yema is a sweet bread made with egg yolks and milk. It’s often eaten during breakfast and is also used to make other types of Mexican bread. The name translates to “egg cake” in English, which gives you a good idea of what it tastes like.

Jalapeno Cheese Bread

Jalapeno cheese bread is a type of pan de yema that’s topped with cheese and jalapenos before baking it in an oven. You can serve this type of Mexican bread for breakfast or as an appetizer at dinner time with salsa or guacamole on top.

FAQs

What Is The Most Common Bread In Mexico?

The most common bread in Mexico is the bolillo. Bolillo is a soft white bread with a very thin crust. It’s popular for making sandwiches and for eating with hot sauce and cheese.

The word bolillo comes from the Spanish word “bola,” which means ball. The traditional shape of this type of bread is round, like a ball.

Bolillos were first made in Spain and brought to Mexico by Spanish settlers who arrived there in the 1500s. Today, they are still a staple food in many cities across Mexico.

Why Is Mexican Bread So Dry?

The short answer is that many brands of Mexican bakery products are made by large corporations and mass-produced like any other bread product sold in grocery stores around the world. These companies can afford to sell their products at a lower price than smaller, independent bakeries because they don’t have to pay workers as much, they don’t use expensive ingredients (like real sugar), and they don’t have to pay for costly equipment upgrades or maintenance expenses.

Conclusion

Mexican bread will have a variety of uses. Ultimately, there are many types of Mexican bread. Whether you prefer an authentic pan dulce or something sweet like a Dona Maria, these varieties are enhanced by their simplicity and rich flavors. As such, they are enjoyed not just in Mexico but in many locations throughout the world. Hopefully, this article has helped you identify your favorite type of Mexican bread so that you can try it for yourself!

Staff Writer At Saved By The Max

Jeremy was responsible for initial staffing and daily management of bar, kitchen, and service. Branding and all marketing activities were part of his responsibilities as well.

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